NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES  Water-Energy Nexus  The relationships between water and energy are complex, and some organi...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES  Water-Energy Nexus  The relationships between water and energy are complex, and some organizations have been working on this topic for a number of years. Some of the most recent information can be found here: https://www.water-energy-food.org/news/archive/2019/  There are links to a number of international articles, as well as information about an upcoming 2020 conference.  In the United States, the National Conference of State Legislatures has compiled additional information here: http://www.ncsl.org/research/environment-and-natural-resources/overviewofthewaterenergynexusintheus.aspx  “State legislatures and natural resource managers have traditionally addressed water and energy as two separate issues. However, water and energy are deeply connected and sustainable management of either resource requires consideration of the other. Thus, resource managers and lawmakers across the country are beginning to take a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the management of water and energy.”  Individual paragraphs provide a summary of the linkages between water and energy that are aligned to the developed economy of the U.S.  A deeper inquiry into the relationships among the variables can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1080/20964471.2018.1524344  “The energy-water nexus, or the dependence of energy on water and water on energy,continues to receive attention as impacts on both energy and water supply and demandfrom growing populations and climate-related stresses are evaluated for future infrastructure planning. These impacts have been studied extensively using integrated assessment, infrastructure risk simulation, integrated analysis, and risk analysis. Among the findings of these studies is the realization that the vulnerabilities of energy-water systems and impacts to them are deeper and more intricate than those that directly affect their physical infrastructures. Impacts of extreme weather and climate events to these systems extend to economic, social and environmental services provided by them. Consequences can include disrupted supply chains, suspended economic activity, and threats to social well-being. Moreover, there are feedbacks between water and energy flows that are influenced by population shifts, regional economic development, urbanization and infrastructure dynamics, land use and land cover change, policy and institutional changes and stakeholder and consumer preferences.”  The work done on this topic by the USGS can be found here: https://www.usgs.gov/news/water-energy-nexus-earth-science-perspective  “Along with many countries around the world, the United States faces two significant, and sometimes competing, challenges: (1) providing sustainable supplies of freshwater for humans and ecosystems and (2) ensuring adequate sources of energy for future generations. A new U.S. Geological Survey report reviews the complex ways in which water and energy are interconnected and describes the earth science data collection and research that can help the Nation address these important challenges.”