NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCESCrater Lakehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_LakeCrater Lake (Klamath: Giiwas) is a crater lake in s...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCESCrater Lakehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_LakeCrater Lake (Klamath: Giiwas) is a crater lake in s...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCESCrater Lakehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_LakeCrater Lake (Klamath: Giiwas) is a crater lake in south-central Oregon in the western United States. It is the main feature of Crater Lake National Park and is famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot-deep (655 m) caldera that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. With a depth of 1,949 feet (594 m), the lake is the deepest in the United States. In the world, it ranks ninth for maximum depth, and third for mean (average) depth. Crater Lake features two small islands. Wizard Island, located near the western shore of the lake, is a cinder cone approximately 316 acres (128 ha) in size. Phantom Ship, a natural rock pillar, is located near the southern shore. Mount Mazama, part of the Cascade Range volcanic arc, was built up mostly of andesite, dacite, and rhyodacite over a period of at least 400,000 years. The caldera was created in a massive volcanic eruption between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago that led to the subsidence of Mount Mazama. About 12 cubic miles (50 km3) of rhyodacite was erupted in this event. Since that time, all eruptions on Mazama have been confined to the caldera. Lava eruptions later created a central platform, Wizard Island, Merriam Cone, and other, smaller volcanic features, including a rhyodacite dome that was eventually created atop the central platform. Sediments and landslide debris also covered the caldera floor. Eventually, the caldera cooled, allowing rain and snow to accumulate and form a lake. Landslides from the caldera rim thereafter formed debris fans and turbidite sediments on the lake bed. Fumaroles and hot springs remained common and active during this period. Also after some time, the slopes of the lake's caldera rim more or less stabilized, streams restored a radial drainage pattern on the mountain, and dense forests began to revegetate the barren landscape. It is estimated that about 720 years was required to fill the lake to its present depth of 1,949 feet (594 m). Much of this occurred during a period when the prevailing climate was less moist than at present. Some hydrothermal activity remains along the lake floor, suggesting that at some time in the future, Mazama may erupt once again. NOTE: More information on Sustainable Water Resources is available at https://sites.google.com/site/sustainablewaterresources/