NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES  Florida Everglades  General information about the Florida Everglades can be found here:http...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES  Florida Everglades  General information about the Florida Everglades can be found here:https://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/circ1182/pdf/12Everglades.pdf ; “The Everglades ecosystem includes Lake Okeechobee and its tributary areas, as well as the roughly 40- to 50-mile-wide, 130-mile-long wetland mosaic that once extended continuously from Lake Okeechobee to the southern tip of the Florida peninsula at Florida Bay. Since 1900 much of the Everglades has been drained for agriculture and urban development, so that today only 50 percent of the original wetlands remain. Water levels and patterns of water flow are largely controlled by an extensive system of levees and canals. The control system was constructed to achieve multiple objectives of flood control, land drainage, and water supply. More recently, water management policies have also begun to address issues related to ecosystem restoration. Extensive land subsidence that has been caused by drainage and oxidation of peat soils will greatly complicate ecosystem restoration and also threatens the future of agriculture in the Everglades.  However, the general description is only the start of extensive research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of this ecosystem.   “The USGS Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystems Program provides science to support management and restoration of America’s Everglades. This program supports multi-year monitoring, modeling, and research projects that span the entire range of scientific disciplines. A recent emphasis has been on climate change effects. Research topics include biogeochemistry, invasive species detection and ecology, impacts of climate change, threatened and endangered species, ecosystem modeling, and monitoring water flow and quality. Details can be found here:https://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/environments-program/science/everglades?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects ; “The Daniel Beard Center in Everglades National Park provides the base for most of the field work done on the control of invasive reptiles by USGS Fort Collins Science Center staff. The team works in Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and other parts of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem focusing on, among other species of concern, control and containment of the Burmese python and Argentine tegu.” Activities of the office can be found here:https://www.usgs.gov/centers/fort/science/south-florida-natural-resource-center?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects ;