NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES   Renewable Natural Resources and the Great Lakes Restoring and Sustaining Great Lakes Ecosystems...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES   Renewable Natural Resources and the Great Lakes Restoring and Sustaining Great Lakes Ecosystems http://mailchi.mp/rnrf/free-digital-issue-of-renewable-resources-journal-8vhm7t5c1f?e=64a1996e71 Shared with Canada and spanning more than 750 miles (1,200 kilometers) these vast inland freshwater seas provide water for consumption, transportation, power, recreation and a host of other uses. More than 30 million people live in The Great Lakes basin, and the impact of their daily activities, from the water consumed to the waste returned, directly affect the Great Lakes environment. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)1 was launched in 2010 to accelerate efforts to protect and restore the Great Lakes by providing additional resources to make progress on the most critical long-term goals for this important ecosystem. The GLRI has been a catalyst for unprecedented federal agency coordination through the Interagency Task Force and the Regional Working Group, which are led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Great Lakes clean up and restoration activities frequently focus on “Areas of Concern.” These areas are defined under the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement as geographic areas where significant impairment of beneficial uses has occurred as a result of human activities at the local level. At the time of the agreement, there were 43 areas of concern including contaminated or deformed fishes, eutrophication, toxic sediments, and habitat destruction. Areas of concern occur in all of the Great Lakes. Future conservation efforts should include work to lay foundations for future projects to protect and restore species diversity, reintroduce populations of native species to restored habitats and evaluate their survival, protect or restore species that are culturally significant to tribes in the Great Lakes region, manage invasive species that inhibit the sustainability of native species, pioneer species propagation and relocation techniques, and implement other activities necessary for the eventual recovery of federal and state threatened and endangered species. Though clear improvements have been realized due to efforts of the GLRI, restoration of the Great Lakes is a work in progress. In order for successful restoration to continue, efforts to ensure that future conservation action is taken will be necessary.   This study will also be linked on the 2017 Reports and Publications Page of the Sustainable Water Resources Site at https://sites.google.com/site/sustainablewaterresources/">https://sites.google.com/site/sustainablewaterresources/   Tim Smith Sustainable Water Resources Coordinator Government Web Site, https://acwi.gov/ Sustainable Water Resources Site, https://sites.google.com/site/sustainablewaterresources/">https://sites.google.com/site/sustainablewaterresources/